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Archive for the ‘Canoeing’ Category

Tompkins, Cayuga, and Seneca Counties, in partnership with the New York State Department of State and Alta Planning and Design, have completed work on the Draft Cayuga Lake Blueway Trail Plan and are seeking public comment on the draft plan between now and Tuesday, November 12. (Read our story on the Blueway Trail proposal)

Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com includes West River & more.

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

The National Water Trail System defines water trails as “recreational routes on waterways with a network of public access points supported by broad-based community partnerships”. They provide conservation, recreational, and tourism/economic development opportunities and are focused on boaters, especially paddlers (kayaks, canoes, standup paddleboards, etc.). The Draft Cayuga Lake Blueway Trail Plan identifies the existing conditions along the lakeshore for paddlers; assesses regional assets; identifies gaps in access areas, and proposes locations for short term and long-term improvements and launch sites. It also describes opportunities to market Cayuga Lake as a paddling destination and lays out a variety of possible paddling itineraries, destinations and experiences on the lake for all abilities and preferences, from day trips to multi-day overnight adventures.

Comments can be submitted through the plan’s website directly until November 12th. http://cayugablueway.weebly.com/. Comments may also be submitted via email to Tom Knipe in the Tompkins County Planning Department, tknipe@tompkins-co.org. All comments received by November 12th will be considered as the plan is completed. The Final Cayuga Lake Blueway Trail Plan will be released before the end of the year, and it is expected that a coalition of partners from Cayuga, Seneca and Tompkins Counties will begin work on implementing the Plan in 2014.

source: Ithaca.com, link to original post

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source: Massapequa Patch, link to original post

Plans were unveiled Monday for the South Shore Blueway Plan, which will establish a kayak trail through the mashes and bay’s of Long Island’s South Shore.

The Blueway stretches 18 miles from the western boarder of the Town of Hempstead to the Nassau/Suffolk County line.

The plan took share as part of the 2006 Environmental Bond Act. Planning began last year. In November of 2008, the Village of Freeport joined with Nassau County to obtain funds from a Local Waterfront Revitalization grant from New York State.

A water trail is designed for people to use small, non-motorized beachable boats like kayaks, canoes, day sailors or rowboats. There will be various launches, rest stops and shoreline facilities along the way, officials said.

A key element of the plan is sustainability, using green technologies for paths, ramps or any other item that needs to be built. The access plant will also be ADA compliant. The plan calls for interpretive and educational opportunities that will encourage understanding of the South Shore ecosystem and maritime heritage.

“The South Shore Blueway trail will shine a light on the precious wetlands of Nassau County and provide kayak access never before seen in this region,” County Executive Edward Mangano said at Wantagh Park Monday. “I am a proud partner with out local environmental organizations and municipalities to create a new jewel for Long Island.”

According to the project’s website, which you can access by clicking here, the Blueway includes two inlets, four bays, seven new access points and nine boat ramps. For a full list, click here.

The public is invited to share comments during a community forum on Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. at Freeport Village Hall’s conference room. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions. During the 30-day comment period, questions and comments may be submitted to info@southshoreblueway.com.

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By Brian Nearing, Times Union, link to original post

For the first time in more than a century, thousands of acres of Adirondack land around the Essex Chain of Lakes is open to the public for hiking, paddling, skiing, fishing and hunting.

Held for years by the Finch Pruyn timber company, the lands were opened for public access Monday under an interim plan by the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

In August 2012, the state bought 69,000 acres of former Finch lands from The Nature Conservancy, which had bought it from the timber company. With the opening of the Essex portion, about 22,000 of these acres are open to public recreation, which permits day use, but not overnight camping.

Motor vehicle access to Essex lands is open on Cornell Road and on the Boots to Cornell Road. Cars and trucks are allowed to drive on Cornell Road from Woods Road to a gate on the Boots to Cornell Road. A parking area allows access to Deer Pond.

Paddlers may portage canoes and kayaks about a quarter mile to Deer Pond. From there, a half-mile portage reaches a put-in on Third Lake. Paddlers can travel by water to explore First, Second, Fourth, Fifth and Seventh Lakes of the Essex Chain.

Members of private hunting camps that held leases with Finch retain rights that permit motorized access not available to the public, and also have one-acre exclusive-use envelopes around their camp buildings.

A map of the Essex Chain Lakes tract is available online at http://bit.ly/1fGv8Pf

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Kayak Thousand Islands

Kayak Thousand Islands

The publisher of the Common Man outdoor trail & paddle guides for NY, FL and VT has had a major webpage meltdown. As a temporary sole source, the webpage at www.RogerFulton.com has become the backup and the only current online source for most of the Common Man trail guides. The only glitch is that this web page can’t take credit cards, but can accept cash, checks or money orders by mail.

Ski - Lake George

Ski – Lake George

Common Man Books are a great source of trail information for Lake George, Saratoga Springs, the 1,000 Islands,and Adirondacks fire towers. Many of the links in this blog to Common Man books will be dead. Click here instead.

Bike Saratoga NY

Bike Saratoga NY

Paddle Lake George NY

Paddle Lake George NY

Roger Fulton
Phone; 386-956-6089
email: Roger@RogerFulton.com
Webpage: http://www.RogerFulton.com.

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Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

Click here to watch a video & read “Fair Haven Beach State Park.”  Then pick up a copy of “Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes” and paddle Sterling Valley Creek and end at Sterling Pond in Fair Haven Beach State Park.

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Kesselheim shares wilderness paddling insight: “The Wilderness Paddler’s Handbook”

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A Writer Follows the Water – Canoeing in Adirondack Park

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‘Adirondack Paddling’ book an inspiring companion for paddlers

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Explore Fort Ticonderoga on Land and Water!

Explore Fort Ticonderoga on Land and Water!

For the first time ever, visitors to Fort Ticonderoga will be able to explore one of America’s most significant historic sites on water and land.  The new recreational activities will highlight Fort Ticonderoga’s rich historic landscape.  A new interpretive hiking trail winding around Carillon Battlefield offers guests an unparalleled opportunity to explore the site’s epic history and natural beauty and a new canoe rental program provides a unique perspective of the Fort’s history from the stunning waters of Lake Champlain. Admission to the Carillon Battlefield hiking trail is included in a Fort Ticonderoga’s general admission ticket.  Details on canoe rentals can be found at http://www.fortticonderoga.org/visit/recreation or call 518-585-2821.

“Our story is in our landscape,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO. “The unique combination of lakes, hills, mountains, and streams that surround Fort Ticonderoga made it a strategic location in the 18th century and make it one of North America’s most beautiful destinations today.  Its history cannot be appreciated without an understanding of its landscape.”

“This season Fort Ticonderoga begins a new chapter in connecting its epic history with its remarkable landscape by opening access to locations on its grounds that have been inaccessible to visitors.”

The new interpretive hiking trail winding around the long, rocky ridge jutting through the center of the Fort Ticonderoga peninsula and down to the LaChute riverside plains below leads guests to several very different parts of the site, including the Carillon Battlefield. A trail pamphlet identifies several points of historic and natural interest along the 2 mile route.

Viewing the Fort from Lake Champlain is possible through the new canoe rental program where the site’s unspoiled views and Fort’s strategic importance becomes even more apparent when viewed from the lake’s surface.  A self-guided brochure provides highlights of the historic and scenic waterway.

Recognized as the top destination in the Adirondacks by USA News Travel, Fort Ticonderoga connects all guests to a place and time that defined a continent, a nation, and its continued legacy.

Fort Ticonderoga offers more than one hundred exciting and unique events and programs this season! Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Funding for the 2013 season is provided in part by Amtrak.  Visit http://www.fortticonderoga.org/visit/directions for a special 2 for 1 Amtrak offer!

FORT TICONDEROGA – America’s Fort ™

Located on Lake Champlain in the beautiful 6 million acre Adirondack Park, Fort Ticonderoga is a not-for-profit historic site and museum that ensures that present and future generations learn from the struggles, sacrifices, and victories that shaped the nations of North America and changed world history. Serving the public since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 70,000 guests annually and is dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of Fort Ticonderoga’s history.  Accredited by the American Association of Museums, Fort Ticonderoga offers programs, historic interpretation, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May 17 through October 20, 2013. The 2013 season features the Fort’s newest exhibit “It would make a heart of stone melt” Sickness, Injury, and Medicine at Fort Ticonderoga which explores early medical theory, practice, and experience as each relates to the armies that served at Fort Ticonderoga in the 18th century.  Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 100 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

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Lake Placid News, link to original post

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo Wednesday announced that for the first time in 100 years, the public can now access for recreational purposes the Hudson and Cedar Rivers within the new lands recently added to the Forest Preserve.

Parking areas, public motor vehicle access, a hiking route to the Cedar River and waterway access sites for non-motorized watercraft are designated and available for public use on these newly acquired public lands in the towns of Newcomb and Minerva in Essex County and Indian Lake in Hamilton County.

“The addition of these 7,200 acres to the state’s extensive Forest Preserve will help drive tourism in the Adirondacks region,” Cuomo said in a press release. “Starting today, (Wednesday) this land along the Hudson and Cedar Rivers, which has been closed to the public for the past century, will open for New Yorkers to enjoy this summer and fall. I encourage everyone to come explore the many outdoor recreational activities that this breathtaking area has to offer.”

Signs and kiosks located at both the boat launch in Newcomb and on the newly acquired properties provide information about the lands and the premier paddling and fishing opportunities now open to the public along the Hudson and Cedar Rivers. A map depicting the lands that are currently open to the public; the location of parking areas, public motor vehicle access and hiking routes and waterway access sites is posted on signs and information kiosks and is also available on DEC’s website at www.dec.ny.gov

Michael Carr, executive director of The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter was pleased with the announcement. said “TNC applauds New York State for bringing these special places into public ownership and making them a part of our collective conservation legacy,” Carr said in the press release. “DEC’s interim recreation plan will allow the public to explore remote and beautiful stretches of the Hudson and Cedar rivers for the first time in more than 100 years, which TNC recently transferred to New York State. More opportunities will follow and we look forward to hearing people’s stories as they discover so many newly accessible wild places in the Adirondacks.”

The Adirondack Park Agency has proposed seven possible land classifications for the Essex Chain Tract and surrounding lands. The proposed land classifications and the schedule for public comment may be found on the APA website www.apa.ny.gov/.

Public access facilities outlined in the interim plan have been established where existing areas are cleared and infrastructure is already in place. Recreation users will need to follow existing paths to carry around rapids when traveling down the Hudson River and camping is allowed more than 150 feet from any road, trail, spring, stream, pond or other body of water. Marked trails, camping sites and portages will be designated and constructed once DEC, in consultation with APA, completes a Stewardship Plan later this summer. This Stewardship Plan will identify the location for a new trail for the public to safely access OK Slip Falls, designated camping sites along the Hudson and Cedar Rivers, and the official locations of portages around challenging stretches of the Hudson River for paddlers.

Upper Hudson River

Paddlers can travel nearly 12 miles on the Hudson River from Harris Lake to a landing just above the confluence with the Indian River. There are several stretches of flat but moving waters that people of all skill levels can enjoy, especially in the upper portion.

The river also contains numerous rapids and shallow rocky areas. Depending on water levels, the rapids are mostly rated Class 1, 2 or 2+. Under the certain water levels a few of the rapids may rate Class 3, such as Long Rapids and Ord Falls. During low water conditions a considerable amount of portaging, dragging and lining of kayaks and canoes will be required especially in the lower portion of the river.

Less adventurous paddlers can take advantage of a long stretch of flat water above and below 28N, and the Blackwell Stillwater section above and below the Iron Bridge Landing, which also provides access to the lower Goodnow River.

Trips shorter than the entire 12 miles can be taken by paddling from Harris Lake to the Iron Bridge Landing or from the Iron Bridge Landing to the Indian River Landing. Inexperienced paddlers should make use of the flatwater sections, carry around all rapids or hire a licensed guide to lead their trip.

The Town of Newcomb Boat Launch on the Harris Lake (Beach) Road is the best location to launch canoes, kayaks and rafts. Parking is available at this location and in the nearby parking lot at the Town of Newcomb Beach. Information about the available access, including maps, is provided on a kiosk at the boat launch.

The public can drive to a parking area located approximately 0.9 mile from the Iron Bridge Landing. Paddlers need to carry their canoes and kayaks between the parking area and the landing on the river. Information about the available access, including maps, is provided on a kiosk at the parking area.

The Iron Bridge parking area can be reached by taking the Goodnow Road, off Route 28N in Newcomb, approximately 5.5 miles south to the southeast corner of Goodnow Flow. Turn left on to the access road and the parking area is two miles away at the end of the access road. DEC recommends that only high clearance pickups and SUVs use the roadway at this time.

Another parking area is located at the end of the Chain Lakes Road, approximately three miles north of Route 28 in Indian Lake. The public can walk the 0.8 mile on the roadway between the gate at the parking areas and the landing above the confluence of the Hudson and Indian Rivers. Information about the available access, including maps, is provided on a kiosk at the parking area.

Cedar River

The Cedar River, Pine Lake, Mud Pond, Clear Pond, Corner Pond and the surrounding lands can all be accessed from the same parking area at the end of the Chain Lakes Road. It is a 3.5-mile walk from the parking area along a roadway to the landing on the Cedar River.

Paddlers can enjoy the flatwater section of the Cedar River above and below the landing. The rapids above and below the flatwater section and the lack of carries prevents paddlers from accessing the upper reaches of the Cedar River and the Hudson River from the landing. Paddlers can also enjoy the four ponds on the forest preserve lands south of the Cedar River.

Anglers can fish the Cedar River for brook and brown trout. Anglers can also fish for native lake trout and stocked rainbow trout on Clear Pond or stocked brook trout and panfish on Pine Lake. Float planes previously restricted to landing on the western portion of Pine Lake can now land anywhere on the lake.

Additional information on the recreational opportunities on these and other nearby forest preserve and conservation easement lands can be found on the DEC Eastern Adirondacks Trail Information web page at www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9199.html.

The Essex Chain Lakes Tract and the Indian River Tract are part of the former Finch, Pruyn & Co. lands purchased by New York State from The Nature Conservancy (TNC).

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