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Archive for the ‘Hiking’ Category

5 Best iPhone Apps for Hiking — MyNature Apps

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Excitement is building for the TrailLink app, which was recently featured on the TODAY show. You can download the app from the iTunes store beginning November 15; an Android version will follow in early 2014. The app includes all the great TrailLink.com features you know and love—interactive maps, tons of photos, firsthand reviews, and detailed trail facts—plus downloadable maps for offline use and the ability to see your location on the trail.

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The Town of Wilson Walkway and Bicycle Trail, is expected to be completed by Thanksgiving, Supervisor Joe Jastrzemski said Wednesday.

Niagara County Legislator David Godfrey presented the check from the Niagara County Greenway Commission at the Town Board meeting. The money came from the New York Power Authority. “It really enhances our harbor and business district,” the supervisor said. “It’s a beautiful addition to the town.”

The project cost $134,000 with $90,350 coming from the grant and $43,650 from the town.

The path extends from Park Avenue, through Shore Drive to the harbor. It ties the harbor and transient boaters to local business. Jastrzemski hopes that trail will be extended to the Tuscarora State Park in the future.”We’re grateful to the Greenway Commission,” said Jastrzemski to worked with Godfrey on the grant process. “The path almost complete,” he said. “We’re working on lighting and signing.”

source: Niagara Gazette, link to original post

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A good read from Backpacker Magazine: Common Hiking Boot Lacing Techniques

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WGRZ, link to original post with VIDEO

The beauty of the Adirondack region of NY State is undeniable. From it’s sparkling lakes to it’s acres of deep forest, it is truly a unique place. The mountains are what draw most people here. Majestic peaks span for miles, almost surreal in their vast grandeur.

The call of these mountains are strong, compelling those who hear it to scale these giants.Even now, with relatively well trails to the top the climb is still not easy. There are 46 mountains towering over four thousand feet here, and there’s a dedicated and growing roster of people who have hiked all forty six ! Begun in 1925 and officially chartered in 1948, the club is appropriately named ” The Adirondack 46ers”. Phil Corell is Treasurer of the Adirondack 46ers.” Since 1948, we have over eight thousand registered 46ers, we’ve actually logged in 1126 new 46ers in the last three years, the interest by the general population is overwhelming.”

It has been said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, and so it is at the trailhead of every mountain. But some people take that first step at a very young age, Corell is a fine example.” My parents sent me to a summer camp in the Adirondacks, there I was introduced, my first peak was Giant Mountain, and the bug bit me right away, by the age of sixteen I had finished my first round. Then my sons were born, I got to share that, and they finished their 46 at nine and eleven with my wife.”

Then there are those who have completed their initial forty six and go on to complete the challenge in new and intriguing ways.
” There was a fellow bushwacker who climbed all 46 peaks off trail,did not use an established route for any of the peaks.” Corell explains.” There’s someone who has skiied all 46 peaks, on back country skiis, never taking them off. Everyone has their challenge, their reason for being out here, but it’s just a beautiful sense of accomplishment.”

Corell says the Adirondack 46ers are not all about the climb. They also give much back to the environment they love so much. Their volunteers work hard to maintain trails, provide environmental education, and support other groups working toward the same goal. ” We’re trying to give money back to help the environment, to improve the conditions to make the Adirondacks a better place to hike in, and to minimize human impact.”

The 46ers give that back gratefully to the mountains that have given them so much. Corell tells 2 The Outdoors that the group wants to make sure that these mountains are for many generations to come. ” People have to become stewards, they have to give back. The critical thing is if you enjoy this area and you’ve gotten something out of the experience, then how about paying something back ? Do some volunteer trail work, if you can’t do trailwork, then contribute to some of the organizations that do. “

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The NY DEC has opened a new trail to the fire tower on top of Loon Lake Mountain in the northern Adirondacks. The 2.8-mile trail starts on Route 26 in the Town of Franklin in Franklin County, about 5 miles north of the hamlet of Loon Lake.

29 Fire Tower Trails in the Adirondack & Catskill Mountains

29 Fire Tower Trails in the Adirondack & Catskill Mountains

The trail rises more than 1,600 feet from the trailhead to the 2,264-foot summit of Loon Lake Mountain. The open bedrock summit provides views of Lyon Mountain, Whiteface, the High Peaks, and other nearby summits.

The 35-foot Loon Lake Fire Tower is listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places but isn’t open to the public. The trail, trailhead and parking were constructed over the summer by DEC crews and members of the Student Conservation Association Adirondack Program.

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by: Greg Maker, Hudson Valley Reporter, link to original post

More opportunities to walk, run and bike are now available in Dutchess County with the Dutchess Rail Trail now officially open to the public.

County Executive Marcus Molinaro hosted a soft opening for trail on Thursday as county employees ceremoniously removed a barricade on the Rail Trail bridge over Route 55, Wappinger Creek and Old Manchester Road. Walkers, runners and bicycle enthusiasts dressed in their gear followed Molinaro down the trail for the first official walk.

“Today is an historic moment and one step closer to a very long path to bring the Dutchess Rail Trail to completion,” Molinaro said. “This effort began a long time ago thanks to a number of visionaries creating a beautiful linear park. This will be an attraction throughout the county.”

The final piece of the puzzle was a 743-foot bridge that was constructed in late July over Route 55 by the border of LaGrange and the Town of Poughkeepsie. The bridge connected the trail, which runs for 13 miles from the Hopewell Depot in East Fishkill to the Walkway Over The Hudson in the City of Poughkeepsie. The trail is built upon the abandoned Maybrook Line of the defunct Central New England Railway.

Molinaro said that with 2.4 million people from 42 countries visiting the Walkway Over the Hudson, they will now have an opportunity to see even more of Dutchess County by walking on the Rail Trail.

“The benefits of it are so reaching,” Molinaro said. “This really is a jewel for Dutchess County. This is an attraction to visitors, employers and tourists alike, As other governments are closing parks, we’re opening one today.”

Mary Kay Vrba, executive director of Dutchess County Tourism, said that she is hoping that the Rail Trail increases tourism in Dutchess County. She said that visitors to the county spent $475 million in 2012, an increase of 2 percent from 2011. Vrba said that the Rail Trail will attract more bicyclists from groups such as Bike New York and Hudson Valley Pedal.

“They can ride on the trail without having to deal with motorized traffic,” Vrba said. “It’s a win-win for them and us. Another benefit is people who come here will stay overnight, eat in our restaurants, and go to other venues.The outdoors is one of the things that we highlight and promote all the time.”

Rob Rolison, chair of the Dutchess County Legislature, who said he is a railroad enthusiast, agreed with Vrba that a benefit of the trail is that it will draw people to Dutchess County. He said that the Rail Trail will showcase areas of the county that people don’t normally see including both rural and urban areas.

“Dutchess County is an outdoor type of county and this addition really enhances our quality of life,” Rolison said. “People will spend money here and help with our county budget. As a government official I look at it as more than just a chance to walk, bike and run on it. It’s going to bring in tax dollars and keep Dutchess County running.”

Rolison and Molinaro both gave credit to former County Executive Bill Steinhaus whose administration spearheaded the effort to create the Rail Trail.

There are still portions of the trail that need to be completed. The county will hold another ceremony on Nov. 16 when the construction is finished to mark the official grand opening..

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