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Archive for the ‘Backpacking’ Category

5 Best iPhone Apps for Hiking — MyNature Apps

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A good read from Backpacker Magazine: Common Hiking Boot Lacing Techniques

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WGRZ, link to original post with VIDEO

The beauty of the Adirondack region of NY State is undeniable. From it’s sparkling lakes to it’s acres of deep forest, it is truly a unique place. The mountains are what draw most people here. Majestic peaks span for miles, almost surreal in their vast grandeur.

The call of these mountains are strong, compelling those who hear it to scale these giants.Even now, with relatively well trails to the top the climb is still not easy. There are 46 mountains towering over four thousand feet here, and there’s a dedicated and growing roster of people who have hiked all forty six ! Begun in 1925 and officially chartered in 1948, the club is appropriately named ” The Adirondack 46ers”. Phil Corell is Treasurer of the Adirondack 46ers.” Since 1948, we have over eight thousand registered 46ers, we’ve actually logged in 1126 new 46ers in the last three years, the interest by the general population is overwhelming.”

It has been said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, and so it is at the trailhead of every mountain. But some people take that first step at a very young age, Corell is a fine example.” My parents sent me to a summer camp in the Adirondacks, there I was introduced, my first peak was Giant Mountain, and the bug bit me right away, by the age of sixteen I had finished my first round. Then my sons were born, I got to share that, and they finished their 46 at nine and eleven with my wife.”

Then there are those who have completed their initial forty six and go on to complete the challenge in new and intriguing ways.
” There was a fellow bushwacker who climbed all 46 peaks off trail,did not use an established route for any of the peaks.” Corell explains.” There’s someone who has skiied all 46 peaks, on back country skiis, never taking them off. Everyone has their challenge, their reason for being out here, but it’s just a beautiful sense of accomplishment.”

Corell says the Adirondack 46ers are not all about the climb. They also give much back to the environment they love so much. Their volunteers work hard to maintain trails, provide environmental education, and support other groups working toward the same goal. ” We’re trying to give money back to help the environment, to improve the conditions to make the Adirondacks a better place to hike in, and to minimize human impact.”

The 46ers give that back gratefully to the mountains that have given them so much. Corell tells 2 The Outdoors that the group wants to make sure that these mountains are for many generations to come. ” People have to become stewards, they have to give back. The critical thing is if you enjoy this area and you’ve gotten something out of the experience, then how about paying something back ? Do some volunteer trail work, if you can’t do trailwork, then contribute to some of the organizations that do. “

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Just-Add-Water Beer From Pat’s Backcountry Beverages Might Revolutionize Your Hiking Trip

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As a hiker (and train lover), I like this idea – using trains as a transportation mode to get to hiking trails. I only wish it was more of an option in the US. But, click here to read “What is a Hiking Train Station?” and plan a hiking vacation in Europe.

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There’s a “real-time” blog being kept as Thad Lunceford makes his way east on his end-to-end Finger Lakes Trail backpacking trip…as of today (July 15) he is in Bainbridge, NY headed east, 451 miles down / 110 miles still to go…you’ll love the photo of his blistered foot, many of us have ‘been there and done that’ and can definitely empathize !

Check out the blog at:  http://kimo342.com/

source: Larry Blumberg via FLTC e-list

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Here’s a list (with photos) to get you dreaming. Heck, don’t just dream – go do it. I’ve only hiked 5 of these, so I better get busy: Take a hike: The world’s 30 most spectacular hiking trails

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The Pharsalia Woods Unit Management Plan, covering 13,622 acres in western Chenango County, has been approved by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. The plan includes four states forests: New Michigan, Pitcher Springs, Perkins Pond and Pigeon Hill which are located in the towns of Pharsalia, Plymouth, Pitcher, and Otselic.
“These forests offer a wide variety of recreational opportunities for all of the public including a lean-to for camping on Perkins Pond State Forest,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens.  “DEC staff work diligently at maintaining our forests for multiple-uses and it clearly works well in places like Pharsalia Woods.”

“The high elevation forest habitats found at Pharsalia Woods make it standout as a critically important area on the Atlantic Flyway in Central New York, supporting a great diversity of forest breeding birds,” said Erin Crotty, Executive Director of Audubon New York.  “We commend Commissioner Martens and the DEC staff for finalizing the Unit Management Plan and prioritizing actions that will ensure the high quality forests at the Bird Conservation Area are maintained, and economically important wildlife recreational opportunities are enhanced.”

Donald Windsor, who first proposed that Pharsalia Woods be named an Important Bird Area in July 1997, and member of the Chenango Bird Club, the New York Flora Association, the Chenango County Historical Association, the New York State Archaeological Association, the Bullthistle Hiking Club and the Finger Lakes Trail Conference noted, “The Unit Management planning process is useful to our organizations because the public meetings allow our suggestions to be integrated with those of other organizations. This broad-based contribution enables DEC to optimize the special interests of all its stakeholders to establish a multiple-purpose use of state land.”

“Our organization is especially in favor of the proposed relocation of the Finger Lakes hiking trail that will eliminate the present 1.8 miles of road walking and place the trail entirely on public lands with no road walking,” said Joe Dabes, former Director of Trail Inventory and Mapping of the Finger Lakes Trail Conference and ten time end- to- ender of the 560 mile long main Finger Lakes Trail. “We also appreciate that the plan calls for a proposed new lean-to along the Finger Lakes Trail and  relocation of the Plymouth Lean-to Trail which will eliminate the present 0.7 mile walk along Stewart Road, putting this section of the trail entirely in Pharsalia Woods State Forest.”

Stephen C. Catherman, Vice  President of Trail Maintenance for the Finger Lakes Trail Conference noted, “It is a privilege and a pleasure to work with your organization to further our commitment to maintain a premier hiking trail across New York State.  The Adopt a Natural Resource program and the agreement we have in place with you enables us to realize this goal.  We hope to continue this cooperative relationship far into the future.”

Mark Money, Vice President of the Chenango Sno-Rides, a local snowmobile club that works with the DEC through an Adopt a Natural Resources Stewardship Program, said, “We worked closely with the DEC in creating a parking area at Camp Pharsalia so that snowmobilers can have a safe place to park their vehicles during the winters months. This has provided an excellent opportunity for the Snowmobiling community to park and load/unload vehicles and equipment safely.  Our club keeps the parking area free of snow throughout the winter for anyone who wishes to use the parking area to access the forest.  We appreciate the opportunity the DEC has provided in supplying the community with a safe environment to start and end the day of snowmobiling in Chenango County and beyond.”

The plan outlines management activities on the Unit for the next 20 years and defines goals and objectives for various issues, including biodiversity, timber and public recreation. The Audubon Society has designated a portion of the Unit in the town of Pharsalia as an “Important Bird Area” because it is a regional migratory concentration site and provides breeding habitat for a wide variety of forest nesting species.

Currently the forests in the Unit contain 231 acres of roads and developed areas, nine acres of quarries, 11 acres of open land, 58 acres of shrub land, 347 acres of open/shrub wetlands, 1,603 acres of forest wetlands, 751 acres of mixed hardwoods/natural conifers, 5,558 acres of natural hardwoods, and 5,054 acres of conifer plantation. The remote character of many areas on the Unit provide ideal conditions for recreational activities such as wildlife observation, pleasure driving, hiking, hunting, trapping and snowmobiling. The tornado that impacted this area in 1998 created approximately 1,000 acres of disturbed shrub/young-forest land with hundreds of standing snap trees. This area has attracted interest from the public for nature observation, as it is remarkably different from much of the surrounding area.

Hunting, fishing and trapping are permitted anywhere on the Unit, except where prohibited by regulation, law or sign. Snowmobiling is one of the most popular activities on the Unit. The Nine Mile Trail on New Michigan State Forest is part of the Corridor Trail 7 and is a popular regional destination for snowmobiling. A portion of the Finger Lakes Trail traverses through the Unit on Perkins Pond State Forest and New Michigan State Forest.

New Michigan State Forest’s name will be changed to Pharsalia Woods in the near future to more accurately reflect the history and geography of the area.  All maps and information on the DEC web site will be updated to reflect this change.

The plan may be viewed online at http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/67631.html.  Copies of the plan on CD are available for pick up at the DEC Lands and Forests office in Sherburne, 2715 State Highway 80, and Sherburne, NY 13460

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New Chestnut Lean-to in Danby State Forest

New Chestnut Lean-to in Danby State Forest

The new Chestnut Lean-to is completed and ready for occupancy. It’s located in Danby State Forest  on Finger Lakes Trail map M17.  A special thanks to all that have touched this project in some way, especially those involved in preparation of the site, building the lean-to, and enhancements to the access trail. Thanks to all Finger Lakes Trail Conference and Cayuga Trails Club volunteers.

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WENY, link to original post & video

Eighteen hundred miles, through nine states. That is the distance that Bart Houck and Jo Swanson have traveled as the first hikers to complete the Great Eastern Trail that starts in Alabama and ends at the Finger Lake Trails in Bradford.
“We have encountered lots of weather, physical elements, scenic views, and absolutely the best part of the people that we have met along the way,” said Houck.
The pair started the journey in the snow covered hills of Alabama and during there journey experienced all kinds of severe weather conditions.
Swanson says, “It can be really overwhelming when you wake up and its pouring rain and your tent is wet and everything you have is wet, and then you hike all day in the wet and then you set up a wet tent.”
Houck and Swanson will spend the night in a lean-to that marks the end of the Great Eastern Trail.
“We started out this hike not knowing what it would be, it truly turned out to be something that I was not expecting, and I feel that we have been ambassadors for the trail.” said Houck.
Bartt and Jo want everyone to know how humbled and grateful they are for the support they received.
If you want to see the hikers blog follow the link http://www.gethiking.net/

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