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Archive for the ‘Kayaking’ Category

Point 65 Tequila! Modular Kayaks

Point 65 Tequila! Tandem Modular Kayak

Point 65 Tequila! Tandem Modular Kayak

A new level of innovation for recreational kayaks. Created by award-winning design engineer Magnus De Brito, Point 65 launches the Tequila! A fun, versatile and high-performance kayak that, due to its modularity, is exceptionally easy to carry, store, and haul. The revolutionary solo or tandem combination is the solution you were waiting for.
Click here to see models. Click on details for one & scroll down on the page to watch videos.

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Here’s something you’ll never see in NY State: PHOTOS: Two massive whales narrowly miss California kayaker

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Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

The CNY Kayakers is a club that brings people together to enhance the pleasure of flat water kayaking. They provide opportunities for all levels of experience, from novice to expert, to share, to learn and to have fun, while navigating the many waterways of Central New York. New this year are Wednesday morning paddles. Click here to learn more.

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Written by Marci Diehl, Democrat & Chronicle, link to original post
Finger Lakes Land Trust acquires new properties to conserve for nature walks, birding adventuresIt’s some of the most unspoiled, spectacularly beautiful and ecologically important land in the state. And if all goes according to plan, it will be accessible to the public for low-impact uses like hiking, kayaking, fishing and bird-watching.

Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com includes West River & more.

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com includes West River & more.

In the past year, the Finger Lakes Land Trust has acquired two important pieces of land overlooking Canandaigua Lake and adjacent to the West River — the lake’s principal tributary — adding to the group’s growing list of acquisitions and conservation easements. The goal is to link a crescent of land extending from Bare Hill southward through South Hill to High Tor and the highlands surrounding Naples.

This is serene land that is teeming with wildlife, forests, waterfalls and flora — and facing watershed and potential erosion problems if developed. The proposal to create a Canandaigua Lake water trail and birding trail could prevent some of these issues for generations to come.

The newest acquisition is a 68-acre property that encompasses a 390-foot cove beach on the east side of Canandaigua Lake, along with extensive woodlands on Bare Hill. Last year, the trust acquired 13 acres adjacent to the entrance to the Bare Hill State Unique Area. And in 2011, Constellation Brands donated 64 acres of an abandoned vineyard in the town of Italy at the south end of the lake — land that the National Audubon Society designated an “Important Bird Area.” Over the summer, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will cultivate native grasses to create a grassland area connecting with the state’s emergent wetlands of the West River.

Take A Hike - Finger Lakes available at www.footprintpress.com includes Bare Hill & more.

Take A Hike – Finger Lakes available at
http://www.footprintpress.com includes Bare Hill & more.

The more that people can see land and experience it, the more connected they become to conserving it, says Andrew Zepp, executive director of the trust. The organization’s goal, he says, is to “work cooperatively with landowners and local communities to maintain the character of this area, while enhancing opportunities for outdoor education and recreation.”

Connecting these preserved lands to the DEC’s High Tor Wildlife Management Area is significant. High Tor’s 6,100 acres encompass habitats, wooded hills, cliffs and marshlands in the West River Valley — along with South Hill’s 1,000 acres of wooded hillsides.

And the West River contains one of the largest wetlands in the state — a popular area for kayakers and canoeists.

Bruce Lindsay has managed 700 acres on the top of South Hill for 43 years, and he sees some species actually returning to former habitats, including porcupines, black bears, coyotes, foxes and wild turkeys.

“Turkey vultures with five-foot wing spans soar above the hill,” Lindsay says. “On rare occasions, eagles are seen here. Goldfinch, blue birds, bobolinks and the rare indigo bunting fill the fields. It’s a birder’s paradise.”

The two southeastern hills of the lake are largely undeveloped. Naples resident Kevin Armstrong donated 32 acres of woodland in the area, on steep property along South Hill above the West River.

“There are many people who would see the land as something to be developed just for the views alone,” Armstrong says.

Lindsay, too, is passionate about protecting this land the Seneca people held sacred.

“In the 21st century, we still have an opportunity to ‘do no harm,’ ” he says. “There are vast areas surrounding this lake that still are pristine. The challenge is to do no harm for the future of pure water, appropriate but not unchecked development, and, yes, just space to enable natural beauty to be the essence.”

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Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

Click here to watch a video & read “Fair Haven Beach State Park.”  Then pick up a copy of “Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes” and paddle Sterling Valley Creek and end at Sterling Pond in Fair Haven Beach State Park.

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By Leo Maloney, Oneida Daily Dispatch, link to original post

“There is nothing, absolutely nothing as much fun as messing around in boats.”
— The Magnificent Mr. Toad, “The Wind In the Willows.”

We have a fascination with boats and that extends to kayaks, one of the fastest growing segments of the watercraft industry. The ease of using them, their versatility and the freedom that they give you adds up to a whole lot of fun.

While kayaking various locations, especially local waters, people frequently ask us lots of questions. Many of the questions involve stability, ease of paddling, sea-worthiness and their suitability for fishing. Many people who know us sometimes ask for suggestions since they know that we spend countless hours each summer in our kayaks.

There is no standard answer what type of kayak one should buy. Scott Locorini, owner of Adirondack Exposure, explains that it depends on what a person wants to do and what type of water they plan to paddle. This will determine the type, length and material best suited for that person.

There are three basic categories of kayaks: whitewater, touring and recreational. For most people, a recreational kayak is the normal choice. These are the type that most of us would use for quiet rivers, small lakes and ponds, and the protected shoreline of larger lakes. Within that category there are many designs, variations and models to choose from.

Most recreational kayaks range from 10 to 14 feet in length. According to Scott Locorini, longer length means better tracking and efficiency, while shorter ones are more maneuverable. However, shorter ones also tend to be wider so they require more effort in paddling and tend to wander from a straight line in paddling. Within the longer kayaks there can be a difference in width. Narrower kayaks have more speed and ease of paddling but lack the initial stability of slightly wider ones.

Kayaks are made of several materials. Most common is polyethylene, which is rugged, resilient and moderate in price and weight. Composites of Kevlar or fiberglass are lighter but less durable and cost more. You can get superlight kayaks, but the prices are often incredibly high. Thermoplastics represent a midpoint between the polyethylene and composites in price, weight and durability. I recently purchased one for my wife and she is very pleased with it.

Cockpit sizes vary and larger cockpits make it easier for people, especially larger paddlers, to enter and exit. They also make it easier to carry gear such as photo equipment or fishing tackle in front of you. Of course the more cockpit space you have, the more likely you are to get splashed by waves.

As mentioned earlier, the touring kayaks are longer and narrower for traveling long distances. They have many other features designed for the person who wants to cover long distances such as on a camping trip or long voyage.

Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

I am often asked the question about how convenient it is to fish out of a kayak. Keep in mind that the initial users of kayaks, the Eskimos, depended on them for getting their food. Because of the increased popularity of kayaks and fishing, now there are several specialized models designed just for fishing. Fishing kayaks are the fasting growing niche within this popular sport.

However, most recreational kayaks will do just fine with a little adjustment on your part and limiting your tackle. Scott Locorini reminds us that you can trick out any recreational kayak to be a fishing kayak or you can go for some pre-designed models with larger cockpits, rod holders, etc.

The open or “sit-upon” kayaks offer ease of movement, stability and many features, including the ability to add electronics like fish finders or live wells. Another factor is weight. Since they generally are heavy, most people trailer them or leave them at camp where they fish a single body of water.

For general paddling and exploring, consider the factors of weight and width that were discussed earlier. Remember that initial stability, a comfortable seat and a good back rest are important considerations for anyone who plans to spend considerable time in their kayak.

Take A Paddle - Western NY at footprintpress.com

Take A Paddle – Western NY at footprintpress.com

Your best bet is to test paddle several types and models to see how they handle, how comfortable each is and other factors such as weight. Take the opportunity to test paddle several and you will probably join the growing ranks of people who spend much of the summer in their kayak.

If you are new to kayaking or want to develop your skills further, consider taking various paddling classes from Scott Locorini of Adirondack Exposure. Scott is a licensed Adirondack guide and a member of the Kayak Hall of Fame. He is located four miles south of Old Forge on Route. 28 near Okara Lakes. Check out the website www.adirondackexposure.com or call Scott at 315-335-1681.

Kayaks are actually very stable since you have a low center of gravity sitting right at water level. They are easy to paddle, go where other boats cannot go, and are easy to transport. Choose wisely and join the growing ranks of people who have discovered just how much fun kayaking is.

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by Leslie Lippai, Scarsdale10583.com, link to original post

If you forgot to buy a summer house in Westhampton Beach this year or aren’t going to Martha’s Vineyard for vacation, you might think your only option is to drive out east to Long Island for some beach and paddling fun before the season’s over. Well, although no one will ever confuse Easthampton’s Main Beach with Rye Playland — and kayaking on Georgica Pond is not exactly the same as paddling on the Hudson, it is possible to have a really good time in and on the water around Westchester.

The basics: Westchester County offers a variety of park passes for access to all county-owned parks, pools and beaches where one is required. Visit www.westchestergov.org to learn about your options. Always call ahead before leaving home to make sure a beach has not been closed temporarily after a storm and heavy rain fall. Also, make sure you read the parking signs about where and when you can park. And while it’s not advisable to fall into the Hudson, the river is getting cleaner each year and you should be fine if you overturn, just try not to swallow the water. Visit riverkeeper.org to get up-to-date information on all things Hudson River. Keep in mind that once late September rolls around, parking fees are slashed dramatically, the water is still warm and the crowds for the most part are gone, so it is a great time to jump in or paddle on. And what’s better after a nice day at the beach than ice cream or paletas. We’ve included some of the best shops in the area. Need a kayak or canoe? If you don’t want to buy a new one, check out craigslist for used kayaks, canoes, or paddleboards of all price levels. Don’t want to go it alone? kayakhudson.com offers tours all over our area and provides the equipment without the hassle of loading it in your car. For the truly brave, check out www.manhattankayak.com or www.nykayak.com, which will have you kayaking or doing standup paddle boarding on the water in lovely New York City in no time. How cool.

Armonk

Wampus Pond, Route 128. The pond is named after the Indian tribe who sold the land to New York in 1696. There are rowboat rentals on the weekend and holidays, a kayak launch and fishing for all to enjoy in addition to picnic facilities. Call (914) 273-3230 for more information or visit www.westchestergov.com/wampus-pond

Croton-on-Hudson BluePig

The beach at Croton Point Park is part of a 508-acre park located on a peninsula on the east shore of the Hudson River. The park has camping spots, walking paths, playgrounds, a kayak launch and spectacular views of the Hudson River: (914) 862-5290. Here are some reviews on the park from contributors at Yelp: http://www.yelp.com/biz/croton-point-park-croton-on-hudson-2. For ice cream afterward, locals rave about The Blue Pig (121 Maple St, Croton-on-Hudson; 914-271-3850; thebluepigicecream.com). Popular this season are Pig M&M (vanilla ice cream with M&Ms), honey vanilla with lavender, garden mint chip, and olive oil. New this summer is an outdoor brick courtyard complete with twinkly lights.

Hastings-on-Hudson

Kinnally Cove is directly across the river from the Palisades Cliffs with ample parking. It is a great place to launch a kayak or canoe. There is permit parking (Monday-Friday) across from the lot but you can park after 6pm and on weekends without a permit. For more information, call Hasting’s rec department at (914) 478-2380. While there is no great local ice cream shop to be had in Hastings, the town has a hopping restaurant scene, including Juniper (juniperhastings.com)

Irvington

Scenic Hudson Park is on the Hudson River. The park is accessed via Bridge Street parallel to the Hudson River and the Metro-North tracks. This 4.5-acre park includes a kayak launch. For more information contact Irvington Recreation & Parks (914) 591-7736.

Larchmont

The most popular put-in site for kayakers is at the end of Beach Ave, often called “Dog Beach,” where a public road leads along the Long Island Sound. There is no parking near the launch and you have to leave your car several hundred yards away. If you have the strength to lift your craft over a five-foot retaining wall, try launching from where Ocean Ave curves to meet Magnolia. There is a turn-around loop and parking is allowed nearby. Also, off Lindsley Drive, at the edge of Flint Park, there are rocks that lead down to the water. Some people put in kayaks in here, although we are told it is muddy at low tide.

Mamaroneck

At nearby Harbor Island Park, at the intersection of Mamaroneck Avenue South and East Boston Post Road, you can launch a kayak or canoe year-round. At times the park is overrun by Canadian geese and their droppings, so watch where you step. Call (914) 777-7784 or visit www.village.mamaroneck.ny.us. Skip the ice cream and try a paleta. Paletas are Mexican frozen pops that are either water-based (made with fresh fruit and/or fruit juices) or milk/cream-based, and offered in a rainbow of colors and flavors. We like Paleteria Fernandez, 350 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck 914-315-1598. Hibiscus flower, cantaloupe, kiwi, and mango are just some of the fun and funky flavors to sample.

Mount Vernon

Not a beach or a place to launch a kayak, but definitely worthy of a mention is Willson’s Woods, on East Lincoln Avenue. The facility is one of the oldest in the Westchester county parks system and was acquired in 1924. The park is well-known for its waterpark, Willson’s Waves, complete with a wave pool where you can body surf on three-foot wave, splash downward on an 18-foot high water slide, wander through cascades and fountains in the water playground, or just cool off on the spray deck. The park also has areas for picnicking and fishing. Call (914) 813-6990 for more information.

New Rochelle

Glen Island Beach on Pelham Road offers picnic tables, miniature golf, playgrounds, fishing and more. There is also a kayak launch. Call (914) 813-6720 for information or visit http://parks.westchestergov.com/glen-island-park.

Rye

Rye Playland offers up sand, surf and walks along the boardwalk. There is also self-launch access to Long Island Sound for kayakers and canoers. Call (914) 813-7010 or visit www.ryeplayland.org. Ice cream for everyone at the charming Longford’s Own-Made Ice Cream (4 Elm Pl, Rye 914-967-3797; longfordsicecream.com). The “own-made” ice cream, crafted in Port Chester, boasts 36 flavors and 20 flavors of sorbet, gelato and LoYo.

lighthouse Sleepy Hollow

In this historic town, Horan’s Landing Park, at 9 River Street, offers direct and perfectly legal public access to the Hudson River. The park has a riverside path, sandy beach at mid-to-low tide (no swimming), and picnic tables. The kayak/canoe/boat launch is restricted to car-top vessels (sorry, no trailers). Launch your canoe or kayak here to explore the Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow waterfronts and the Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse (sleepyhollowlighthouse.com). More experienced kayakers can cross the Hudson to wander through the meandering channels of Piermont Marsh or paddle upriver to Croton Point Park. Pick up a copy of the Hudson River Water Trail Guide to help you plan your river adventure. Parking: limited parking on site, additional metered parking on Beekman Avenue. Call (914) 366-5109 for more information. Afterward, try the Lighthouse Ice Cream and Coffee Kompanies (27 W Main St, at the Tarrytown Harbor, Tarrytown 914-502-0339; lighthouseicecreamkompany.com) for high-quality, locally sourced ingredients, such as milk and cream from Salem, New York-based Battenkill Valley Creamery.

Yonkers

While not exactly a beach, The Brook at Tibbetts Brook Park offers lots of water fun for the kids. The park’s former 81-year-old pool has been replaced with a new aquatic complex complete with a spray playground for kids of all ages, in-pool basketball and volleyball, lap lanes for getting in a daily swim workout, and the signature lazy river that inspired the renaming of this water wonderland “The Brook.” (914) 231-2865

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