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NY voters to decide on 2 Adirondack land swaps

 

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The Town of Wilson Walkway and Bicycle Trail, is expected to be completed by Thanksgiving, Supervisor Joe Jastrzemski said Wednesday.

Niagara County Legislator David Godfrey presented the check from the Niagara County Greenway Commission at the Town Board meeting. The money came from the New York Power Authority. “It really enhances our harbor and business district,” the supervisor said. “It’s a beautiful addition to the town.”

The project cost $134,000 with $90,350 coming from the grant and $43,650 from the town.

The path extends from Park Avenue, through Shore Drive to the harbor. It ties the harbor and transient boaters to local business. Jastrzemski hopes that trail will be extended to the Tuscarora State Park in the future.”We’re grateful to the Greenway Commission,” said Jastrzemski to worked with Godfrey on the grant process. “The path almost complete,” he said. “We’re working on lighting and signing.”

source: Niagara Gazette, link to original post

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This class has been in such high demand we added an extra pool class before the season gets underway.
Join in the world’s fastest growing sport. Are you nervous or just plain scared about tipping over?

Take A Paddle - Western NY at footprintpress.com

Take A Paddle – Western NY at footprintpress.com

Let us put your fears to rest in the warmth and safety of a pool with many instructors all around you. Learn that kayaks are much more stable than canoes. All equipment is provided. All you need to bring is a swimsuit, towel, a lock for your locker and a positive mental attitude. All instructors are New York State Licensed Guides. This is a one night/evening class running from 6:00pm to 9:00pm at the Williamsville South High School Pool 5950 Main Street Williamsville, NY 14221 (located on the North side of Main St between Youngs & Evans Roads)

Cost is $73.00. Please call Paths Peaks & Paddles at 716-213-0350 if you have any questions.

Paths Peaks and Paddles is teaming up with the Williamsville Community Education to present this session. You do not have to be a resident of the Williamsville to sign up. You can sign up on line at: Williamsville Community Education (direct link) or by phone at 716-626-8080.

Once you learn the basics, go explore the wonders of Western NY, using the guidebook “Take A Paddle – Western New York Quiet Water for Canoes & Kayaks,” available here as a pdf file e-book.

Paths Peaks & Paddles, Inc.
1000 Ellicott Creek Road
Tonawanda, New York 14150
Phone: 716-213-0350
Website: www.pathspeakspaddles.com
E-Mail: pppinfo@pathspeakspaddles.com

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WGRZ, link to original post with VIDEO

The beauty of the Adirondack region of NY State is undeniable. From it’s sparkling lakes to it’s acres of deep forest, it is truly a unique place. The mountains are what draw most people here. Majestic peaks span for miles, almost surreal in their vast grandeur.

The call of these mountains are strong, compelling those who hear it to scale these giants.Even now, with relatively well trails to the top the climb is still not easy. There are 46 mountains towering over four thousand feet here, and there’s a dedicated and growing roster of people who have hiked all forty six ! Begun in 1925 and officially chartered in 1948, the club is appropriately named ” The Adirondack 46ers”. Phil Corell is Treasurer of the Adirondack 46ers.” Since 1948, we have over eight thousand registered 46ers, we’ve actually logged in 1126 new 46ers in the last three years, the interest by the general population is overwhelming.”

It has been said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, and so it is at the trailhead of every mountain. But some people take that first step at a very young age, Corell is a fine example.” My parents sent me to a summer camp in the Adirondacks, there I was introduced, my first peak was Giant Mountain, and the bug bit me right away, by the age of sixteen I had finished my first round. Then my sons were born, I got to share that, and they finished their 46 at nine and eleven with my wife.”

Then there are those who have completed their initial forty six and go on to complete the challenge in new and intriguing ways.
” There was a fellow bushwacker who climbed all 46 peaks off trail,did not use an established route for any of the peaks.” Corell explains.” There’s someone who has skiied all 46 peaks, on back country skiis, never taking them off. Everyone has their challenge, their reason for being out here, but it’s just a beautiful sense of accomplishment.”

Corell says the Adirondack 46ers are not all about the climb. They also give much back to the environment they love so much. Their volunteers work hard to maintain trails, provide environmental education, and support other groups working toward the same goal. ” We’re trying to give money back to help the environment, to improve the conditions to make the Adirondacks a better place to hike in, and to minimize human impact.”

The 46ers give that back gratefully to the mountains that have given them so much. Corell tells 2 The Outdoors that the group wants to make sure that these mountains are for many generations to come. ” People have to become stewards, they have to give back. The critical thing is if you enjoy this area and you’ve gotten something out of the experience, then how about paying something back ? Do some volunteer trail work, if you can’t do trailwork, then contribute to some of the organizations that do. “

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By William J. Kemble, Daily Freeman, link to original post

Work has been completed on a 4,500-foot section of trail named in honor of the late David Corbett on the town-owned Comeau property.

“David designed the plan for renovating the trails back in 2009, and it was … his plan and the work of a lot of other people that really brought the trails up to a high-class standard,” Councilman Ken Panza said during a Town Board meeting on Tuesday.

Corbett is credited with securing wood slabs that had been used for the Coney Island boardwalk and having them placed on the 76-acre Comeau property to keep people from walking through wetlands. In December 2011, about six months before he died, Corbett said the project had proven popular despite concerns from people who wanted to avoid putting manmade materials along the trail.

“We put in 220 feet of the now-famous Coney Island boardwalk,” he said at the time. “Despite some initial protestations, some quite loud, most people are now using it, including a number of people who originally had a problem with it and feel it is more than a worthy solution now.”

A board-approved resolution honoring Corbett credits him with creating a “model for collaboration between the town, the public and Woodstock Land Conservancy for future stewardship of the Comeau trails.”

Panza said another recent milestone on the Comeau property is the expansion of its soccer field.

“This is a project that was presented to the Town Board in … 2009, and now, almost exactly four years later, it’s done,” he said. “The soccer field has been expanded. The grass is growing. I’m not sure it’s ready to be played on yet, but this was a major project. It took a lot of time and effort by a lot of people working out the details.”

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By NED CAMPBELL, Observer-Dispatch,l link to original post

Dressed in baggy camouflage pants and smoking a cigar, Michael Mosher Jr. didn’t look like a cyclist.

But gathered outside Jack’s or Better tavern on Route 316 Thursday with about 20 cyclists who wore spandex pants and brightly colored windbreakers, Mosher was eager to go on a six-mile tour of the city. “I’m new to the area, and it’s helping me get to know the area and the people,” he said.

Mosher was taking part in the 12th annual Bicyclists Bring Business roundtable and bike-around event organized by Parks & Trails New York and the New York State Canal Corporation, which teaches cities how to market to and profit from cycling tourists.

He learned about the event from his friend Paul Guerrant. “He’s new, so I’m bringing him along,” the 11-year Oneida resident said.

A frequent user of the Erie Canalway Trail, Guerrant said he was interested to learn more about the city’s network of rail trails at the previous day’s roundtable discussion, he said.

Working with Madison County planners, the Oneida Rail Trail committee has applied for a $700,000 state Transportation Enhancement Program grant to fund an about 3-mile stone-dust surface trail starting at the Canalway Trail head in Wampsville and ending just shy of downtown Oneida, said Joe Magliocca, committee president.

That’s part of the committee’s larger goal to connect as much of the city’s 11 miles of rail trails as possible while highlighting Oneida’s rich railroad history. “Bicycling tourists are always looking for a destination outside the trail, an interesting community with either historic sites or unique downtowns, not just for places to eat or to stock up on drinks,” Magliocca said.

The trick is to encourage those people to stop in Oneida with proper signage, said Patti Meakin, the city’s recreation coordinator. “Thirty-six miles from DeWitt to Rome is a New York State Park, so we’ve got that going for us, and we’re only a mile down the road,” she said, referring to the Canalway Trail. “So we need a few signs, I’d say.”

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The NY DEC has opened a new trail to the fire tower on top of Loon Lake Mountain in the northern Adirondacks. The 2.8-mile trail starts on Route 26 in the Town of Franklin in Franklin County, about 5 miles north of the hamlet of Loon Lake.

29 Fire Tower Trails in the Adirondack & Catskill Mountains

29 Fire Tower Trails in the Adirondack & Catskill Mountains

The trail rises more than 1,600 feet from the trailhead to the 2,264-foot summit of Loon Lake Mountain. The open bedrock summit provides views of Lyon Mountain, Whiteface, the High Peaks, and other nearby summits.

The 35-foot Loon Lake Fire Tower is listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places but isn’t open to the public. The trail, trailhead and parking were constructed over the summer by DEC crews and members of the Student Conservation Association Adirondack Program.

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