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Archive for the ‘Trail’ Category

Long Adirondack trail, short (and gorgeous) day hike

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Ontario Pathways is a linear rail trail. It forms a large “V” with a leg from Canandaigua to Stanley and another leg from Stanley to Phelps. Before reaching Phelps, it passes through the town of Orleans in what’s called the Wheat Road section. The linear trail now has a side loop. Doug Daniels spearheaded a group of volunteers to build the loop tril on land owned by Ontario Pathways between the rail trail and Flint Creek. The new trail is marked by white rectangular blazes.

Take Your Bike - Rochester available at www.footprintpress.com

Take Your Bike – Rochester available at http://www.footprintpress.com

To find the new loop trail, head north on Ontario pathways. From the intersection where the Route 488 bypass (necessitated by the damage to the Route 488 bridge) rejoins the rail trail, look straight across to find the white blazes. The trail will lead down to and along Flint Creek, ending at a farmer’s lane, where you hike back up and rejoin the rail trail.

Take Your Bike - Finger Lakes available at www.footprintpress.com

Take Your Bike – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

Source: edited from article by Tim Wilbur in the OP newsletter. Tim didn’t mention the length of the new loop trail so if anyone knows, please add it as a comment.

Both “Take Your Bike” guidebooks include Ontario Pathways.

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Parks & Trails New York’s interactive map of the Erie Canalway Trail— a cross-state route between Buffalo and Albany along the legendary Erie Canal—has been updated and optimized for mobile devices. The map can be found on the Parks & Trails New York website: www.ptny.org/bikecanal/map.

Since the original site launched in 2008, the award-winning Cycling the Erie Canalway Trail interactive map has helped thousands of visitors plan their journeys along the iconic Erie Canal. As more and more visitors are using web-enabled devices, PTNY created an optimized version of its popular map that functions on both desktop PCs as well as smartphones and tablet devices. The revised map features improved search functions, a new distance measuring tool, and GPS—all with a clean, modern look and feel.

With GPS-enabled capability, users can find exactly where they are relative to the Trail and easily locate nearby attractions and services, including museums, historic sites, parks, lodging, bike shops, restaurants, convenience stores, ATMs, pharmacies, and hardware stores. Parking areas and handicapped accessible trailheads are also included.

Users can view the entire Erie Canalway Trail, from Buffalo to Albany, or zoom in for more detail. They can pan or scroll through the entire route, choose a specific region to explore, or find the location of a particular attraction, lodging establishment or bike. Many of the points of interest feature a web-link for more information.

“We’re excited to be able to provide this updated map for Erie Canalway Trail visitors,” said Parks & Trails New York Executive Director Robin Dropkin. “The Erie Canalway Trail is an economic engine for upstate New York, and we are confident that the new interactive site will encourage additional visitors to come and see the beauty and experience the heritage of the Erie Canal.”

“Thanks to the new and improved interactive map now available on the Parks & Trails New York website it is now easier than ever for people to plan their visits to the Erie Canalway Trail,”  said Canal Corporation director, Brian U. Stratton.  “We are delighted to be able to direct visitors to this new planning resource.”

“What a great tool for helping people enjoy the Canalway Corridor,” said Beth Sciumeca, Executive Director of the Erie Canalway  National Heritage Corridor.  “Whether you want to spend just a few hours or cycle the entire Erie Canalway Trail, this is the go-to map for planning a trip.”

More Erie Canalway Trail resources: guidebook and supported bike tour

Parks & Trails New York also offers a companion guidebook to the Erie Canalway Trail, Cycling the Erie Canal, with 42 color maps and interpretive information, as well as tips on cycling, travel and trip preparation—all in a handy 5” by 9” spiral-bound package that can easily be tucked into a saddle bag, backpack, or car glove compartment.  The organization also organizes a supported bike tour along the Erie Canalway Trail every July that attracts more than 500 cyclists.  More information on the guidebook and bike tour, plus other Erie Canalway Trail resources, can be found at www.ptny.org.

Parks & Trails New York is the leading statewide advocate for parks and trails, dedicated since 1985 to improving the health and quality of life of all New Yorkers through the use and enjoyment of green space. Parks & Trails New York has worked with more than 275 community organizations and municipalities to develop and maintain a network of parks and trails throughout New York State.  The organization’s “Close the Gaps” campaign is dedicated to completing the last 75 miles of the Erie Canalway Trail to achieve a 365-mile continuous, off-road trail between Buffalo and Albany.

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bike ice creamMy bike stops for ice cream. I also use ice cream as a go-to-goal when heading out biking. In that spirit, here’s a new reason to follow the Erie Canalway Trail to Lockport:

Lake Effect Ice Cream opened its new Lockport ice cream parlor, a cone’s throw from the Erie Canal, in June. Tourists have been flocking to the store, no doubt having earned a fling after soaking up the canal’s backstory for a solid hour.

Take Your Bike - Genesee Valley available at www.footprintpress.com

Take Your Bike – Genesee Valley available at http://www.footprintpress.com

The store (79 Canal St., Lockport) usually carries more than 25 flavors from Lake Effect’s far-ranging menu. That includes established favorites like Salty Caramel and Frozen Hot Chocolate, and wacky ones like Love Potion # 9 (raspberry, lavender).

Take Your Bike - Rochester available at www.footprintpress.com

Take Your Bike – Rochester available at http://www.footprintpress.com

The biggest draw to the new shop isn’t the ice cream – it’s what they can build with it. Lake Effect pints are already available at many area Tops Markets and Wegmans. The shop also offers floats, ice cream coffee drinks and ice cream cookie sandwiches the size of a baby’s head.

But people have been driving to Lockport for their sundaes, said Jason Wulf, who runs the company with Erik Bernardi.

A Wee Bit of Scotland ($4 “mini,” $5.50 large) features Lake Effect’s Whiskey and Brown Sugar ice cream, layered into a plastic parfait cup with raspberry sauce and toasty granola-like oats, adorned with whipped cream and a stick of shortbread. (A “mini” sundae starts with two big scoops of ice cream, and is enough for most mere mortals.)

Wulf said he drew inspiration for the sundae from a trip to Scotland with his wife, Heather. At a restaurant he experienced the Scottish dessert cranachan, which involves whipped cream or pudding, honey, whiskey, oats and fresh raspberries. “I wanted to bring something back from that trip, and it just seemed perfect,” he said. Lake Effect already made whiskey ice cream.

Another popular sundae is the Morning Commute, with Mocha Cappucino ice cream, chunks of Paula’s Donuts, whipped cream, chocolate sauce and chopped walnuts.

“We get people coming from far and wide,” said Wulf. “We have people come from Batavia and Orchard Park, not just Kenmore.”

For info, visit www.lakeeffecticecream.com or call 201-1643.

source: Buffalo News

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By Charley Hannagan, Syracuse.com,link to original post

The Spafford Town Board is discussing a Finger Lakes Land Trust plan to buy 205 acres from the Burns family on Route 41 to create hiking trails at the southern end of Skaneateles Lake.

A waterfall on Randall Creek is part of the property the Finger Lakes Land Trust plans to buy from the Burns family in Spafford to create hiking trails at the southern end of Skaneateles Lake. (Courtesy Andy Zepp)

A waterfall on Randall Creek is part of the property the Finger Lakes Land Trust plans to buy from the Burns family in Spafford to create hiking trails at the southern end of Skaneateles Lake. (Courtesy Andy Zepp)

The Finger Lakes Land Trust has an agreement to buy the property from Bill and Leonard Burns. “It’s the linchpin property in our goal to create a greenbelt along the south of Skaneateles Lake,” said Andy Zepp, executive director of the land trust. “There’s a lot of it rugged woodland. It includes small meadows and agricultural areas that provide wonderful lake views, and a waterfall on Randall Creek.”

The town board must make sure the plan conforms to local zoning laws enacted in 2010 and a state environmental review. The board was to discuss the plan Thursday night and a public hearing on the project will likely be held in mid-August, said town Supervisor Webb Stevens.

Zepp is hopeful the town will approve the project soon and that the trust can buy the land within two months. The Burns family will continue to farm the rest of the 600 acres they own nearby, he said.

Map of the land the Finger Lakes Land Trust hopes to buy from the Burns family in Spafford. Courtesy Karen Edelstein

Map of the land the Finger Lakes Land Trust hopes to buy from the Burns family in Spafford. Courtesy Karen Edelstein

The majority of the land is located on the west side of Route 41 near a scenic overlook. About five acres on the east side of the road will be part of a 4,000 foot-long corridor that will connect the property to the Ripley Hill Nature Preserve, a 130-acre preserve owned by the Central New York Land Trust.

The Finger Lakes Land Trust plans to demolish an abandoned house on the property, build a 12-car parking lot, build interpretive kiosks and create a 1.5 mile loop trail over the more rugged sections of the property, Zepp said. A second trail of a little more than a mile would be built to connect the property to Ripley Hill, he said.

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atcThe Appalachian Trail Conference is offering two contests:

First, text ATC to 80100 to win prizes plus get $10 donated to the trail conservancy. Click here for details.

Second, there’s the “I am the Appalachian Trail” video contest which is a fun concept.

Thanks to Carol White Llewellyn (The Finger Lakes Travel Maven) for sharing these. She found them while she was researching a visit to the Appalachian Trail.

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Click here to watch the video: Reflections on Biking the Erie Canalway Trail

Click here o find out more about the Erie Canway Tour.

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