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All good things eventually come to an end. Now is the “end time” for New York Outdoors blog. I’ve enjoyed writing and compiling news snippets for 6 years now. Before that we published an e-newsletter for our publishing company Footprint Press. Over the years I’ve heard from many of you with positive feedback on the blog. Hopefully you found it useful and informative. I will leave the old posts live because they are a trove of free information and every day new people discover them.

Rich and I have sold our DisplayStands4You business and wound down Footprint Press. Many of our guidebooks will still be available at retail stores, supplied by two wholesalers. And you can still buy the guidebooks as pdf file e-books at our web site.

In retirement, we are beginning a new adventure. We’ve traded in our kayaks for a 36 ft. trawler. We will live aboard and travel the Great Loop around the US and Canada for several years. If you want to follow our latest exploits, sign up to receive postings from our new blog http://www.choicesontheloop.wordpress.com. We will cut our land ties on November 4th, 2013 and begin by heading south for the winter.

Thank you for following this blog over the years. You’ve been a loyal band of readers, customers, and outdoors lovers. May your lives be filled with wonderful outdoor adventures also.
Sue

5 Best iPhone Apps for Hiking — MyNature Apps

Click here to explore Open Water!

In addition to our traditional coverage of kayak touring, Open Water relates unique aspects of all paddlesports, covering everything from kayak fishing to stand-up paddleboarding (SUP). Thye publishers of Sea Kayaker magazine selected the title Open Water for its roots in our history; Open Water was the working title for what became Sea Kayaker magazine back in 1984. We switched to Sea Kayaker, because we felt Open Water was too broad a title and didn’t tell our readers precisely who we were. Today we welcome the breadth Open Water gives us to incorporate a variety of paddlesports in our coverage as we continue our own evolution within the ever-evolving paddlesports industry. With an initial readership of 15,000 readers who are primarily sea kayakers, we will relate the new topics back to sea kayaking. As the readership diversifies, so will our coverage.

Open Water’s paddler-to-paddler structure provides an ideal venue for paddlers of all writing abilities to share their experiences and knowledge. We are looking for contributors, primarily from the paddlesports industry, so if you are an avid paddler looking for the opportunity to build your reputation, we would like to hear your ideas for stories that pertain to Open Water. We also invite manufacturers and Sea Kayaker readers to participate in a forum-format response to topics presented, giving everyone the opportunity to tell their story and earn feedback.

We hope you enjoy Open Water. Happy paddling.

Not subscribed to Open Water? Click here to sign up for free!

Tompkins, Cayuga, and Seneca Counties, in partnership with the New York State Department of State and Alta Planning and Design, have completed work on the Draft Cayuga Lake Blueway Trail Plan and are seeking public comment on the draft plan between now and Tuesday, November 12. (Read our story on the Blueway Trail proposal)

Take A Paddle - Finger Lakes  available at www.footprintpress.com includes West River & more.

Take A Paddle – Finger Lakes available at http://www.footprintpress.com

The National Water Trail System defines water trails as “recreational routes on waterways with a network of public access points supported by broad-based community partnerships”. They provide conservation, recreational, and tourism/economic development opportunities and are focused on boaters, especially paddlers (kayaks, canoes, standup paddleboards, etc.). The Draft Cayuga Lake Blueway Trail Plan identifies the existing conditions along the lakeshore for paddlers; assesses regional assets; identifies gaps in access areas, and proposes locations for short term and long-term improvements and launch sites. It also describes opportunities to market Cayuga Lake as a paddling destination and lays out a variety of possible paddling itineraries, destinations and experiences on the lake for all abilities and preferences, from day trips to multi-day overnight adventures.

Comments can be submitted through the plan’s website directly until November 12th. http://cayugablueway.weebly.com/. Comments may also be submitted via email to Tom Knipe in the Tompkins County Planning Department, tknipe@tompkins-co.org. All comments received by November 12th will be considered as the plan is completed. The Final Cayuga Lake Blueway Trail Plan will be released before the end of the year, and it is expected that a coalition of partners from Cayuga, Seneca and Tompkins Counties will begin work on implementing the Plan in 2014.

source: Ithaca.com, link to original post

Take A Hike - Finger Lakes available at www.footprintpress.com includes FL Nat'l Forest & more.

Take A Hike – Finger Lakes available at
http://www.footprintpress.com

The Nature Conservancy will dedicate 107 forested acres on Nov. 28 that will become part of the conservancy’s West Hill Preserve. The preserve, which now totals 550 acres, is along Seman Road in the town of Naples, Ontario County, near the southern tip of Canandaigua Lake. Part of the Finger Lakes Trail passes through the property.

Folks from TD Bank, a U.S. banking enterprise owned by a financial corporation based in Toronto, will attend the dedication of the Hickory Ridge parcel. TD Bank has provided funds to pay for this acquisition and other Nature Conservancy work in the Finger Lakes, as a green-minded offset to the bank’s use of tree-consuming paper.

source: D&C

source: PostStar.com

Two historic fire towers closed for more than 20 years could be reopened under a plan to boost tourism in the Adirondacks.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation said this week that restoring the Hurricane Mountain and St. Regis Mountain fire towers would allow full public access. The plans also call for interpretive materials related to the towers’ history.

If the projects go ahead, the restorations are expected to result in increased tourism in Essex and Franklin counties.

Both towers have been closed to the public since they were discontinued for use as fire observation stations. The Hurricane Mountain tower closed in 1979, and the St. Regis Mountain tower was shut down in 1990.

The towers are listed on the state and national registers of historic places, which allows government officials to look at alternatives that would allow for their preservation.

The towers had been slated for removal because Hurricane Mountain is classified as a primitive area and St. Regis Mountain is in a canoe area. Both land classifications called for the fire towers to eventually be removed, but in October 2010 the Adirondack Park Agency board voted to classify the land beneath the two towers as historic, a move that allowed them to remain and be restored.

The restoration plans are available online and for public review at DEC headquarters in Albany and the Region 5 headquarters in Ray Brook, located just outside Lake Placid. CDs of the plan also will be available at the same locations, as well as the offices of the Town of Keene and Town of Santa Clara.

The DEC is accepting public comment through Nov. 15.
Online:
Hurricane Mountain tower: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/78001.html
St. Regis tower: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/78006.html

The Nature Conservancy & U.S. Fish and Wildlife agreed to remove an old, unneeded dam from Reynolds Gully, a high-quality stream that provides habitat for native brook trout and flows eventually into Hemlock Lake, the near-wilderness lake that provides Rochester with drinking water.

That stretch of Reynolds Gully passes through a 310-acre parcel the conservancy owns near Hemlock Lake, which is in Livingston County about 30 miles south of Rochester.  The group hopes to add the property to Harriett Hollister Spencer State Recreation Area, which lies between Hemlock and nearby Honeoye Lake on Ontario County.

“The project will restore more natural movement of water, better connect the stream to its floodplain and remove an unused structure on the river that is a hazard in times of heavy rain,” the Central and Western New York chapter of the conservancy said in a statement. ““Now, for the first time in more than 50 years, brook trout will be able to travel freely in this stretch of the watershed.”

source: D&C

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